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How are Social Security benefits handled post-divorce?

Most people in Gig Harbor look forward to one day retiring and the freedom that comes with it to pursue their hobbies and interests. However, those who have divorced, and especially those who have gotten a "grey divorce," may have concerns about how they will fund their retirement. These individuals may wonder if there is a way they can collect Social Security retirement benefits based on their ex's record, even if they have divorced.

The good news is that in some circumstances, one can collect Social Security retirement benefits based on their ex spouse's record. This may be true, even if one has remarried. In order to collect on the ex's record, several elements must be met.

First of all, the marriage must have lasted at least a decade. Moreover, the ex-spouse cannot be married. The ex-spouse must be at least 62-years-old. In addition, the Social Security retirement benefits that the ex would be eligible for based on his or her record must be less than what he or she would be eligible for based on the work record. Finally, the one seeking benefits must be eligible for Social Security retirement benefits themselves.

If one has not applied for Social Security retirement benefits, but they would be eligible for them, the ex can collect benefits based on the one seeking benefit's record, if the spouses have been divorced for at least 24 months. If the ex qualifies for Social Security retirement benefits based on his or her own record, the Social Security Administration (SSA) will initially pay that amount. If the benefit based on their own record is greater, the ex will receive further benefits based on the one seeking benefit's record, and the two benefits combined are equivalent to the higher amount.

Most people want to make sure they can afford to retire, and those who have divorced may wonder what their options are post-divorce. For some, Social Security retirement benefits will be a way to supplement their retirement savings. Keep in mind that this is only a brief overview of this topic. There are more details, and this post cannot guarantee any particular result. Those who want to learn more may need to seek legal advice.

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